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What is Oumuamua and where did it come from?

Artists impression of Oumuamua

Its been covered by this site before but here's a re-cap. Oumuamua is the name of an asteroid that visited our Solar System nearly a year ago. Most asteroids just orbit the Sun and stay in a short orbit, mainly in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Scientists have said is it from another solar system and is an Interstellar visitor. There had been those who believed it to be an alien craft but as we've not made contact, think we can discount that one.

Oumuamua passed to within 0.25 A.U. of the Sun. 1 A.U. is the distance between the Earth and the Sun so therefore the asteroid passed within a quarter of the distance between Earth and the Sun.

A group of scientists have identified four possible locations of where the star could have come from. Two stars are easy to find information on whereas the other two are "obscure" stars and don't have easy classification names. The other two stars have GAIA references and are not discussed here and for more information, visit Arxiv.

As mentioned in my previous article, it had been believed that the star came from Lyra constellation. The asteroid started on its journey as a result of a possible collision or explosion.

The name Oumuamua, not one to roll off the tongue easily for most people is a Hawaiian term. Researchers from the University of Hawaii were first to spot the object so they had the luxury of it being named. They chose Oumuamua as it is the Hawaiian term for Scout. Metro

Hip 3757

Hip 3757 is a red dwarf star and not one that can be seen with the naked eye. The star is calculated as being in the constellation of Cetus, the whale. The star is relatively close by galactic standards at about 83.83 light years based on Hipparcos 2007 measurements.

HD 292249

HD 292249 is more solar like but too far away to be seen with the naked eye. The star has been calculated as being in the constellation of Monoceros. The star is yellow/white in colour similar to our own star, the Sun, it is too far away to be seen.


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