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What is the largest star in the constellation of Orion?

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) is the largest star in the constellation of Orion and has an calculated/estimated radius of 887.00 times that of the Sun. It is a best guess calculation, we do not know for sure the actual size of the star as it is too far away.

The star has an apparent magnitude of 0.45. Apparent magnitude is a measure of how bright the object is as seen on Earth. It is possible to see this star with the naked eye.The smaller the number, the brighter the star is. for comparison reasons, the Sun's apparent magnitude is -26.74. The dimmest star that we can see without the help of a pair of binoculars or telescope for the record is 6/6.5 Overall, Betelgeuse is the 10th in the night sky.

As a general rule, the largest star in the constellation has a Bayer classification of Alpha but it is not the case for the amentioned constellation. The system was devised by Johann Bayer in 1802. When the Greek alphabet is used up, the Latin alphabet is used afterwards.

The star is a red less luminous giant star star based on the spectral type of the star. It is located at a distance of about 497.96 light years from our Solar System. It would take a spaceship 1 year per light year distance at the speed of light. A light year is the distance that light travels in a year which is about 5.88 trillion miles.

We currently do not have any spaceship that is capable of travelling that fast. The fastest man made object is the New Horizons probe which would take 54,000 years to reach the nearest star, 4.3 light years away.


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