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New Horizons mission to Pluto

On January 19th, 2006, on board an Atlas V rocket, the New Horizons space probe was fired off into space on a near ten year mission to reach Pluto at the edge of The Solar System. The planet was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930 by studying photos of the skies. When the project was began, Pluto had a planet status like all the other planets in the solar system such as our own Earth since then it has been demoted to the status of Dwarf Planet. The fact that the planet has been demoted in no way affects the importance of the mission. Its mission is to be the first inter-planetary space probe to Pluto. All the other planets have been visited over the years and this is the first time a craft has visited Pluto. The below is a picture showing the New Horizons and the different instruments.

Artists impression of the New Horizons Space probe

It is the fastest space probe that has been developed, whilst it has passed other planets on the way, it has not studied those planets, instead it has been inhibernation mode so that it can save its energy for when it reaches the far off planet. Once it has flown past Pluto and its many moons, it will be sent onto further encounters but those will not happen for years into the future.

The New Horizons missions came after a number of previous Pluto missions were rejected such as Pluto Express. The craft will have seven instruments that it will use on the planet, most of which are peoples names.

Planetary milestones of New Horizons


DateEncounter
2001-01-19New Horizons spacecraft successfully launched
2006-04-07New Horizons passes by Mars
2007-02-28New Horizons passes by Jupiter
2008-06-08New Horizons passes by Saturn
2011-03-18New Horizons passed by Uranus
2014-08-24New Horizons will pass the orbit of Neptune
2015-07-14New Horizons will reach its target.

Location of New Horizons

On the N.A.S.A. website, they produce pictures to show you the trajectory of the New Horizons satellite. Although this page might not get updated as often as the NASA site but it does give you an idea of how close and left it has to go.

Picture showing the trajectory of the New Horizons spacecraft.

During the journey, the probe is put into hibernation and woken up when needed. On the 6th December 2014, with still just over 162 million miles to go, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (N.A.S.A.) successfully woke up New Horizons. A response took four hours 26 minutes to arrive at NASA`s Deep Space Network station in Canberra, Australia. 1




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